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The Phoenix Gate

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VC3 writes...

1. Oberon comes off as a slightly arrogant, did he really not consider it beneath him to be intimate and procreate with mortals?

Greg responds...

Only slightly arrogant?

Anyway, your question strikes me as a non-sequitor. I don't understand where the premise of it comes from, so I don't know how to answer it.

Response recorded on October 21, 2015

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Anonymous writes...

Assuming they were in a place where they were both at full power, were both not holding back, and there was no chance of peace, who do you think would win between Oberon and Earth-16 Dr. Fate?

Greg responds...

See, now, the Hulk is more powerful because the madder he gets, the stronger he gets. But the Thing can still beat him if he keeps his wits about him.

Response recorded on July 13, 2015

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Michael Cohen writes...

Hi Greg. I am a big fan and I have a copyright question for you . The characters you use in Gargoyles are besides the main cast are mythological. So that would put them in the public domain, but your spin on them is that protected by copyright. Such as Oberon and Titania's connection to Avalon and their devours.
Thanks and Cant wait for Rebels and whatever else you do.

Greg responds...

Oberon and Titania, to use your examples, are public domain. But our designs of them are not. And it one began to hew too closely to the backstories we created for them, Disney could, in theory, sue.

Response recorded on June 30, 2015

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Mara writes...

We know that Oberon sent the Fae out from Avalon in order to teach them some humility... Was there a singular inciting incidentthat caused this ruling, or was it just from the sheer number of small incidents of individual Fae?

Greg responds...

Okay, first. I try not to use the word "Fae" to refer to all of Oberon's Children. That's a fan term, which I have - through not paying attention - occasionally found myself using by accident or out of laziness. But I'm trying to break myself of that habit.

Anyway, the answer is BOTH, i.e. there was a cumulative effect of multiple incidents that started Oberon thinking along certain lines. But there was also a singular incident that ultimately triggered his decision.

Response recorded on March 09, 2015

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JC writes...

I'm honestly not trying to have an "ah ha! Gotcha" moment here (although it may seem like it after I ask my questions), as I am honestly curious and a little confused.

You've said that Odin was able to circumvent Oberon's rule of not stealing Avalonian artifacts from mortals because he felt that it belonged to him.
My question is:

1) Why does he believe the Eye still belongs to him after he gave it up willingly (i.e. not stolen from him)?

To put it in "mortal perspective," if a woman gives up her baby for adoption, and for whatever reason the adoptive family decides to give the baby to someone else, and the birth mother takes the baby back, thats kidnapping (i.e. theft)...even if the birth mother feels justified, reasoning that this new family isn't who she agreed to give the baby to and doesn't like how they are raising the child, if the authorities caught her, she would be punished the same as if she hadn't given birth to the baby - as she gave up all rights to the child in the first place.

Now, in Odin's case, Oberon is the authority and Odin was able to "bend" Oberon's law because he "felt" justified:

2) Does Oberon agree with Odin, that he is the rightful owner dispite having given it away a long time ago?

If so:
3) Why? Does he not see contractual agreements with mortals binding?

If not:
4) Was Odin punished for breaking the law or forgiven? (If this is a story for another day, I'll understand if you do not feel like answering this one).

Greg responds...

1. Reversion clause.

I'm not sure I don't believe that extenuating circumstances would negate your analogy. Plus, if you gave your baby up to adoption to someone specific, I'd lay odds that in many adoption contracts, there may in fact be a clause that gives the birth parents the option of getting the child back instead of it going to an unapproved third party. But in any case, Odin is a god (from his point of view). He sure as hell wouldn't think much of your analogy.

2. I don't think Oberon knows or cares. But I tend to think he wouldn't think much of your analogy either.

3. What contract with what mortal are you referring to? Mimir was not a mortal.

4. See above.

Response recorded on September 16, 2014

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Anonymous writes...

I have a few questions regarding Banshee/Molly.

1a. Is the plate that covers her mouth made of iron?
1b. If not, how does it restrict her powers?
1c. Also, if it's not iron, why did Oberon put it there instead of "decreeing" her powers not work (like the restrictions on mortal interferance)?

2. Why is the plate still there when she becomes Molly if all of her magic is lost in that form anyway?

3. Is the plate a temporary punishment or permanant - meaning it cannot be removed, even by Oberon himself?

Greg responds...

1a. No.

1b. Oberon's power does the trick.

1c. Whim?

2. Huh? When does that happen?

3. Oberon can clearly remove it. Listen to his dialogue.

Response recorded on September 10, 2014

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JC writes...

You've said that "sides were taken" during the war between Mab and Oberon.
I have a few questions regarding this conflict:

1) Were the "sides" you refered to composed of, lets say "morally ambiguous," Children like the Wierd Sisters, Banshee, Anansi, and Raven versus the relatively benign Children like Puck, Odin, Coyote, and Grandmother?

2) Does Oberon hold any animosity for those who sided against him, ranging from general distrust to outright distain? Does he forgive any of them completely?

3) Do any who took Mab's side still prefer to be refered to as "Mab's Children?"

4) Were any Children who fought against Oberon imprisioned along with Mab?

Greg responds...

These are all spoiler questions. No comment.

Response recorded on September 03, 2014

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cyber-Xanatos writes...

hey i was wondering how would you describe oberon's relationship with the avalon clan amicable respectfully or professionally distant
also does boudicca like oberon at all

Greg responds...

1. All of the above.

2. Sure. He gives her treats.

Response recorded on January 31, 2014

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Matthew writes...

Since you are a big Shakespeare fan, I thought to ask if you've read A Midsummer Tempest by Poul Anderson? It's set in a world where all of Shakespeare's plays really happened?

Greg responds...

No. And I won't, so as not to crowd my head with other folks' ideas. Sounds really cool, though. We were trying to accomplish the same thing (among other things) on Gargoyles.

Response recorded on August 26, 2013

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Otho Fernandes Damasceno writes...

I would like to make a few questions about The Children of Oberon's weakness: Iron.
1) Why they are vunerable to it to begin with?
2) Is iron COMPLETLY inmune to their magic, or only highly resistent to it?
3) If so, how much iron composition other substances (like Steel) would need to be at least resistent to their magic?
4) If a Children of Oberon turn itself into a creature stronger than an average Gargoyle, would he/she be able to break a iron chain with it's bare hands?
5) If the Children of Oberon can't affect iron with magic, how did Oberon managed to do things like levitating Xanatos' laser-gun, shockwave several robotic gargoyles and melt a lamppost with his bare hands?

Greg responds...

1. Maybe because most iron comes from outer space? (Honestly, I don't know. They just are. Like Mon-El's vulnerable to lead.)

2. Iron is immune, but if you can pick up a pair of wood tongs with your magic, you can use the tongs to pick up the iron rod. (Or something like that.)

3. Any iron in an alloy adds resistance, but if you're looking for a numerical value, you've asked the wrong guy.

4. Nope.

5. Depends what they are made of. And also look at the answer to question two. A mighty wind is a mighty wind and can blow anything out of it's path. If Oberon can create a wind, it blows.

Response recorded on March 20, 2013

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