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Phil writes...

Hey Greg,

I'm sure it's cliche and you're tired of hearing it by now, but I loved Gargoyles as a kid and continue to do so...I guess there's no need to go into any more detail than that. Just wanted to start off by saying thanks for all the hard work.

Anyways, onto the questions:

1. With the Marvel/Disney merger, what are the odds now that we'll see you pick up where you left off on the Gargoyles comic?
2. Does SLG still own all the rights to the comics you wrote for them or is it all owned by Disney and thus now a part of Marvel as well?

Now that the semi-practical questions are out of the way, time for my far nerdier side to kick in:

3. If asked to do a Marvel/Gargoyles crossover, who would be your first choice in Marvel character to cross over with? And since it's likely to be Spidey, who's your second?
4. Have you been approached about bringing Gargoyles into a future Kingdom Hearts game?

Thanks,
Phil

Greg responds...

1. I don't know that the Marvel merger has any effect on Gargoyles.

2. For starters, Disney owns Marvel, not the other way around. Marvel has no control or say over Gargoyles. But I don't know the specifics of the Disney/SLG deal or who owns the reproduction rights. I do know that Disney maintains ownership of the intellectual property including anything added in the comics.

3. Uh... I'm not that excited about the idea at all. But I guess the Defenders.

4. No.

Response recorded on March 30, 2010

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Laura 'ad astra' Sack writes...

Sneaking in a question or two at work lest I start falling far behind again. I apologize if I overlap anything already asked, I've been trying to avoid Spiderman spoilers. I have a stack of set aside responses for after the rest of the season airs. (Though I wonder if I should have bothered; what I didn't pick up just skimming I probably read checking the 'waiting to be asked' que. Oh well...)

First- Love the show.

I did have that first reaction to still art some did thinking it looked a little young, but between prioritizing fluidity of motion for the web slinger on the one side, and not getting that overly static look from being too faithful to the comic art on the other, I am completely won over.

Also, I am not terribly well versed in Spidy lore. (It's too expensive to get hooked on two major comic universes and I started on DC first.) Despite not getting all the references, the deference shown to the history, right down to mining the comics with the intent of not creating a single new character, really shows. Very impressive.

Second-
I thought it was particularly classy to post the credits of the episodes because they went by too quickly to be seen on screen. I assume people like working with you because they know they are not taken for granted. (Just like changing the "Staring..." in the opening credits shows respect to the characters. Love that.) I do wonder -

1- If each episode is written by a particular person or team, what do the staff writers do?
2-If you already have a voice director, what does 'casting' do? Or does the voice director not choose talent too? (I think this question was more involved when I scribbled it on my note sheet months ago, but I didn't write out the details and no longer remember.)
3- How did Cheeks Galloway end up with that nickname? I took a glance at his website and saw his autobigraphy is named "Cheeks Unclenched" Much mirth followed.

Greg responds...

1. Most of the writing is done freelance. That is, they get paid a fee to write a script. And they don't have offices with us, but work out of their homes or wherever. Our staff writer on Spidey, Kevin Hopps, was paid by the week and had an office at Sony TV Animation. He's still writing scripts, just like the freelancers, but he's also there to bounce stuff off, which given the way I work, is a hugely important resource. He also did things like writing the audition sides and other small tasks, and he really helped break the entire second season with me.

2. Well, in our case, our voice director and our casting director were the same person: Jamie Thomason. But you could have a casting director (in charge of casting various roles) who doesn't actually direct the actors' performances, which is what the voice director does.

3. That's really not my story to tell - and I couldn't do it justice. But "Cheeks" refers to the anatomy you think it does.

Response recorded on March 24, 2010

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bob writes...

Hello I was just wondering if you could help me with something I know you've answsered questions like this before but this one is different. I think that I would like to write lyrics and get paid for it haha I was just wondering if this is a real job? I know your not in the musuc bussiness but you are a writer and have written music before so any help would be apprciated. Were would I go with this? And who do I talk to to make this Happen? Thank you very much for your time and any help you can give, I really appriciate it!

Greg responds...

I wouldn't personally want to do it for a living, but it's fun to do every once in a while. But I'm afraid I have no career advice to give in this area beyond confirming, that yes, some people do lyric-writing for a living.

Response recorded on March 30, 2009

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Wesley Nichols writes...

What is youre opinion of the script writer's strike going on in New York and Los Angeles?

Greg responds...

I believe that the writers are 100% in the right. And I wish that my guild, the Animation Guild, was able to get residuals -- ANY residuals -- for its writers.

Response recorded on December 21, 2007

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Peter Brülls pb@rogue.de writes...

Hi.

Ypou write

"4. Would Disney ever consider selling the rights to Gargoyles?

No. They won't even let go of Clarabelle Cow. They don't want to take the risk that someone else could make a mint on their property and make them look bad."

"Clarabelle Cow" is actually a bad example, I think. She's making regular appearance in Non-US Mickey Mouse stories, acting as best female friend to Minnie Mouse.

Greg responds...

You're talking LICENSING, not selling the rights. Clarabelle acting as Minnie's best friend does not mean they've sold the rights... unless you think they've SOLD THE RIGHTS to Minnie Mouse. (And just to be clear, they HAVE NOT.)

These are two very different financial concepts.

Non-US Mickey, Minnie or Clarabelle stories are under a licensing agreement. But Disney retains the rights.

It's the difference between leasing a house and selling one.

Response recorded on February 08, 2007


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