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Christina 'MacBeth' Marmann writes...

Hi Greg,
some questions on my fave immortal Scotsman:
1) to which extent is MacBeth able to use magic? i guess he could handle the Grimorum Arcanorum.
2)what would happen if MacBeth killed Duncan McCloud?
3)what does MacBeth do in 'Future Tense'? for that matter, why is Xanatos able to kill Demona in cyberspace?
4)would MacBeth be one of the Good Guys in Gargoyles 2158? i sincerely hope so.
5)did you actually know that MacBeth's name means "son of life" in Gaelic, or was he chosen because of his particular history? if it's a coincidence, that's a nice one.
'K, this is it for now, keep up the good work, cy around
Perhaps you want to check out this url: http://wwww.blaschdo.de
Christina

Greg responds...

1. Sure.
2. Who exactly is your favorite immortal Scotsman? Look, I'm not too interested in theorizing about cross-overs. That seems like something you should have your own fun doing.
3. Macbeth isn't part of Puck's illusion.
4. Macbeth is still alive in 2158, but I don't see him having a major roll, at least not early on. Maybe in 2159 or 2160.
5. Didn't know. Thanks for filling me in.

Response recorded on January 25, 2000

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Fan writes...

I noticed there was considerable space between "Enter Macbeth" and the "City Of Stone" miniseries that explained his and Demona's history. Was it your intention to keep us guessing or did the storyline just work out that way?

Greg responds...

Are those options mutually exclusive?

Response recorded on January 25, 2000

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shogun raptor writes...

Greg, I was the one who asked about the Demona/macbeth link carrying over to delilah, namely because if Delilah was created from half of Demona's DNA, would the link be part of her DNA or would it be connected to her in another way, like through her soul?

Greg responds...

I don't see any connection existing there.

Response recorded on January 24, 2000

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Todd Jensen writes...

A little side-note. I happened to see the episode that you wrote for "Disney's Hercules" - I thought I'd mention it after noticing that somebody else on the list mentioned it. I quite enjoyed it - particularly the portrayal of Theseus as a sort of ancient Greek version of "Batman". I also noticed, as a side-note, that there was a certain thematic echo of "Hunter's Moon" in it (although I don't know if you'd intended it or not) where Hercules got so caught up in his efforts to wreak vengeance upon the Minotaur that he lost sight of what was really important, much the same way as Goliath in his pursuit of the Hunters.

Greg responds...

First off, Todd, thanks for the kind words.

There are certain themes that interest me, and so you'll see them revisited in my work (probably ad nauseum) over and over. The theme of, well, let's call it "What Profit Vengeance?" is one of my favorites. So I wasn't deliberately trying to echo "Hunter's Moon" so much as I was servicing a set of ideas that seemed apropos to both series.

As for the Theseus-as-Batman stuff. Well, that's a no-brainer. The Superman/Batman dynamic -- that is the teaming of a hero possessing superhuman abilities with a hero who merely makes the best possible use of his human abilities -- originated with Herakles and Theseus. (Or at any rate, it goes back that far.) So the notion of flipping that, and playing Herc/Theseus as Superman/Batman seemed wonderfully ironic and a fertile place to find comedy.

In high school, I acted in a play called THE WARRIOR'S HUSBAND. I played Theseus, and I've had a real affinity for the character ever since. In that play, Hercules was kind of a mope. (Very strong, but a mope.) The Greeks were waging war against the Amazons. Hercules was in charge, but Theseus was the real brains of the operation. Yet he's also the guy who really falls hard in love for Antiope, sister to Queen Hyppolyta. So instead of conquering -- as he had originally intended -- Theseus winds up manipulating everyone into a compromise. I like that in a hero.

Theseus is part of a sub-genre of archetypes, (an off-shoot of Trickster figures like Puck, Coyote or Odysseus/Ulysses). He's the primary example of the Archetype of "THE BASTARD", which includes such diverse characters as Shakespeare's Edmund from KING LEAR, Joan of Arc's ally Dunois and multiple characters from Arthurian legend (including Merlin, Arthur, Percival, Galahad and Mordred). There are so many parallels between Arthur and Theseus that reading Mary Stewart and Mary Renault seemed almost redundant. (Not really.)

In fact, Luach (or Lulach) is also a prime candidate for that archetype. When he was born, Gruoch was still married to Gillecomgain. But gossip around the castle hinted that the babe's true father was Macbeth. After Macbeth and Gruoch married, Macbeth adopted the boy as his own. At which point the gossip shifted to insist that Gillecomgain was the boy's father. (You can't win.) Pre-DNA testing, there would be no way for Luach to ever be certain of the truth. Maybe Macbeth didn't even know. Hell, Gruoch might not know.

Life's a bitch when you're a bastard.

Response recorded on January 19, 2000

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Aris Katsaris writes...

When "City of Stone" was first written and produced were you planning that the Hunter legacy would continue through the Canmore family or had you thought that Macbeth had taken up the mask and was now the last of the Hunters?

Greg responds...

Well, it's more complicated then that.

"City of Stone" was originally pitched as a Direct to Video movie. My boss, Gary Krisel, immediately rejected it as a video. (Though, obviously, he had no problem with it being done as episodes.) He felt that a Gargoyle video needed to focus on our heroes -- and I had to admit that "City" was really the story of two of our villains: Macbeth and Demona. Goliath and company have supporting roles at best.

But Gary liked the HUNTER angle. So immediately, Michael Reaves and I came up with the basic story idea for "Hunter's Moon". We made a sincere effort to make both multi-parters stand independent of each other. "City" came first, but the two ideas were born so close together, I can't really give you a definitive answer to your either/or question except to say (in my smart-ass fashion) "Both."

Response recorded on January 10, 2000

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Airwalker writes...

In HIGH NOON when Broadway and Hudson attack Macbeth, Demona feels his pain from across the house. Yet later when Demona is in a fight with Elisa 2 feet way from Macbeth, he feels absolutely nothing. Why is that? Does the spell that allows them to feel each other's pain only apply when she is in her Gargoyle form?

Greg responds...

No.

I'd say that Macbeth must have been feeling something, but that he was steeling himself against the pain. (Something he couldn't do when he didn't know the blows were coming.) I realize this is a bit of a cheat, but that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Response recorded on January 10, 2000

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lisa writes...

1.what were your future plans for demona?
2.what were your future plans for macbeth?

Greg responds...

This is not a forum for novel-length responses. You're question is too broad.

I will say that both characters would have been involved in both the main GARGOYLES series and in GARGOYLES 2158.

Response recorded on January 07, 2000

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lisa writes...

1.in city of stone part 3 demona said to macbeth that it was always the same he blamed her and she blamed him does that mean that they had met after 1057 and gone into a blaming fit?

Greg responds...

I think they've had multiple encounters over the centuries.

Response recorded on January 07, 2000

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lisa writes...

1.did macbeth or demona ever meet the wierd sisters after 1057?

Greg responds...

The Sisters were watching them. I doubt that Macbeth or Demona would get to see them unless seeing them served the Sisters' purposes.

Response recorded on January 07, 2000

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lisa writes...

1.did macbeth actually consider betraying demnoa?

Greg responds...

1. No. Absolutely not.

Response recorded on January 07, 2000


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